Friday Night Traditions At Our Summer Camp In NH

The Friday Night Traditions At Our Summer Camp In NH

Summer Camp In NH

Camps Kenwood and Evergreen is a values-driven summer camp in NH. Our parents tell us regularly that one reason that they chose our summer camp community is because of our emphasis on character education. Over the course of each 7-week season we strive to teach our campers about the value of being an honest, hardworking, empathetic, socially conscious person. Our counselors serve as role models to their campers, actively reinforcing these values in the midst of bunk life, on our ball fields, and in the rest of daily camp life. 

Another way that we do this is when we pause on Friday’s to discuss and reinforce our community’s shared values. As part of an inclusive community we offer two simultaneous gatherings: a historically Jewish Shabbat service, and a non-denominational, ecumenical service. About 90% of our campers come from Jewish homes. We feel that it’s important to offer a weekly Shabbat service for them while also offering a welcoming alternative to our non-Jewish friends. Campers are free to take part in either service, and most happily try out both over the course of each summer.

Fridays are very special at Kenwood and Evergreen. At the conclusion of Friday night dinner our campers with siblings or cousins at our summer camp participate in what we call “Brother-Sister visiting”. It’s a nice, relaxing time each week for the campers with relatives in the other camp to spend quality time together. Afterwards, we announce the start of services over our PA system.  Our campers and staff get very excited for Friday night services, as they have even created a silly, spirited dance to signal its start. Below is a video that I shot last year of our campers participating in it. 

After the Service Call Dance our community members gather for our two different meetings. At our Jewish service we light candles, recite the Sh’ma, and say a few other important blessings. Our campers volunteer to lead the recitation of each prayer, poem or song, and it is common for siblings or cousins to do this together. Counselors who are former campers delight in running our Jewish service, and are affectionately referred to by the kids as “summer camp Rabbis”. Then I give a sermon that tries to highlight our community’s collective values. The sermon is usually a story or allegory with imagery that is easy for our campers to grasp, and is not religiously dogmatic or Torah-based.

If you’d like read the our most recent sermon please click here.

The Ecumenical service feels a lot like a Quaker Friends meeting. Scott runs this smaller service, and spends the time both reading the sermon and asking his group of campers and counselors to engage in a thoughtful discussion about its meaning. At both gatherings we ask the community members how they intend to use the message in their lives during the following week. We also ask if anyone has an example of how they used the previous week’s sermon to make our community a better place.

Our summer camp in NH has many traditions and rituals designed to help our campers know that they are a part of a nurturing community. We invite you to learn more about the many ways we celebrate our time together each summer.

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